Frequent question: How did the defeat of the Spanish Armada upset the balance of power in Europe and the Americas?

The defeat of the Spanish Armada changed the balance of power in Europe. Spain was weakened and so was its control of the seas. This enabled countries like England and France to found colonies in the Americas. Europe’s religious and economic conflicts were not settled by the defeat of the Armada, however.

How did the defeat of the Spanish Armada shift power in Europe quizlet?

How did the defeat of the Spanish Armada change the political balance of power among the European countries? Spain was weakened and so was its control of the seas. Strengthened other countries. … Europe’s religious and economic conflicts were not settled by the defeat of the Armada.

How did the shift in the political balance of power affect the exploration of North America?

How did the shift in the political balance of power affect the exploration of North America? The shift in the political balance of power in Europe allowed countries like England and France to found colonies in the Americas. … Countries like Sweden, Denmark and other European states split with Catholic church.

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How did the Reformation lead to religious wars in Europe?

The emperor had Europe’s leading army and was more than willing to march into Germany and put down Protestants. As these wars — with a mix of political and religious agendas — raged across Europe, princes grabbed for power while the people violently sorted out their deep-seated religious frustrations.

How did the Protestant Reformation lead to wars of religion What were the results of these wars of religion?

Fought after the Protestant Reformation began in 1517, the wars disrupted the religious and political order in the Catholic countries of Europe, or Christendom. … The conflicts culminated in the Thirty Years’ War, which devastated Germany and killed one third of its population, a mortality rate twice that of World War I.

Why was the defeat of the Spanish Armada important quizlet?

The significance of England’s defeat of the Spanish armada was that it ended Spain’s domination of the Atlantic. Why did the Dutch revolt against Spain? Because Philip raised taxes and took steps to crush Protestantism. The Dutch revolted and to punish Spain, Philip executed 1,500 Protestants.

Why was the defeat of the Spanish Armada a turning point?

the defeat of the spanish armada in 1588 by this country signaled a turning point in history. Spain was no longer the dominant world power. This country that defeated the spanish armada would eventually become the dominant world power. the first permanent english settlement in the new world began in virginia in 1607.

How did the defeat of the Spanish Armada change the political balance of power among the European countries?

The defeat of the Spanish Armada changed the balance of power in Europe. Spain was weakened and so was its control of the seas. This enabled countries like England and France to found colonies in the Americas. Europe’s religious and economic conflicts were not settled by the defeat of the Armada, however.

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What were some of the global effects of the colonization of the Americas?

Colonization ruptured many ecosystems, bringing in new organisms while eliminating others. The Europeans brought many diseases with them that decimated Native American populations. Colonists and Native Americans alike looked to new plants as possible medicinal resources.

How did exploration impact the world?

HOW DID EXPLORATION AFFECT THE WORLD? European countries brought many lands under their control. The world was opened up and new crops were introduced from one land to another. … In the NEW WORLD, many native peoples died because they had no resistance to the European diseases that explorers and crews brought with them.

What ended the wars of religion?

The war began when the Catholic League convinced King Henry III to issue an edict outlawing Protestantism and annulling Henry of Navarre’s right to the throne. For the first part of the war, the royalists and the Catholic League were uneasy allies against their common enemy, the Huguenots.